Letter From The Publishers

Patience, Grace and Gratitude

Achieving balance on all levels is the true measure of vibrant health. We dedicate our February issue to the many ways to achieve a state of equilibrium. Seeking greater balance starts with an honest assessment of what we need and want out of our life; this inner awareness brings a sense of calmness and well-being.…

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Local Articles & Spotlights

Couples Communication Reaps Many Rewards

By Seth Kopald

by Seth Kopald Couples seem to push each other’s buttons and often say hurtful things. Perhaps the closer people are, the more they feel safe to let their guards down.…

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Step into Your Personal Power

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

by Mary Mazur Those in complete alignment with all aspects of themselves and the spiritual, mental, emotional and physical parts are existing in perfect harmony wake up feeling refreshed, relaxed,…

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Feeding the Organs for Winter Maintenance

By David Stouffer

Western medicine excels at treatment options for a variety of ailments, but often falls short of providing optimal prevention strategies. It’s true that recent changes in traditional Western healthcare phi­losophy…

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A Marriage of Creativity & Spirituality

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

Mara Evenstar is the co-owner of Evenstar’s Chalice, director of Conscious Rites, board member of the Intentional Living Collective and co-founder of Sophia Unfolds: These organizations were all created to…

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New Workshops at Castle Remedies

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

Castle Remedies and manager Mary Tillinghast have launched a new winter season of homeopathic classes. She says, “In these workshops, we will briefly touch on the history and theory behind…

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Huron River Watershed Council Needs Local Representation

By Martin Miron

by Martin Miron Sixty-seven local governments in the Huron River Watershed Council (HRWC) have the power to determine the location of houses, farms and businesses throughout the watershed. These land…

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News Briefs

Reiki Treatments Enhanced by New Technology

Andrea Kennedy, reiki master practitioner, instructor and owner of Mainstream Reiki, now offers the PEMF Inframat Pro First Edition Chakra Mat, the newest technology in healing mat therapy, as an add-on for $20 in addition to the regular reiki appointment fee. The mat consists of 16 pounds of seven different natural gemstones and offers five…

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Everything Depends on Clean Water

Jeremy Smiley, owner of the Fuller Life Water Company, says, “Tap water contaminates chlorine, fluoride, and silicone phosphate are at all-time highs and that does not include agricultural runoff, industrial waste and unused pharmaceuticals entering the water supply. One solution is reliably pure bottled water delivered to a home or business. Fuller Life Water has…

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Easy Introduction to Holistic Health Care

The Ann Arbor School of Massage, Herbal & Natural Medicine offers a full student and professional clinic in a peaceful setting, offering bodywork sessions for integrated therapeutic massage, reflexology, Polarity Therapy and energy balancing. Additionally, the wellness center maintains an Herbal Pharmacy and Dispensary, with medicinal and therapeutic herbal formulas. Check out and come to…

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Food Summit Highlights Local Access

Slow Food, Huron Valley’s 11th annual Local Food Summit will be held February 16 in Towsley Auditorium at Washtenaw Community College. The Summit, brings together farmers, consumers, consumers, academics and retailers committed to creating a vibrant, sustainable and just local food community. In addition to education and networking, participants will enjoy a local meal curated…

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Find Antique Building Resources in Ypsilanti

Materials Unlimited, a full-service retail antiques store and restoration facility housed in a three-floor, 15,000-square-foot 1920s Art Deco building in downtown Ypsilanti, showcases all varieties and styles of antique lighting, hardware, home decor, leaded glass windows, doors and furniture. The staff is adept at helping customers choose the proper style and function for the period…

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Outdoor Art Program Looking for Artists

SculptureWalk, a year-long community arts project in which juried sculptures are installed at 12 locations in historic downtown Chelsea, is celebrating its 10th year. Artist are invited to submit entries for the 2019 season. Through a juried selection, winning artists receive a $750 award and a yearlong, highly visible platform to display their work. Sculptures…

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An Evening of Classic Compositions

Celebrating its 40th year, the Washtenaw Community Concert Band’s Celebration of the Community concert at 7:30 p.m., February 28, will include the William Tell Overture and musical highlights from West Side Story and Oklahoma. A local high school band student winner of a concerto competition will perform and win a $1,500 prize. Refreshments are provided.…

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Auditioning Talent for Chelsea Sounds & Sights Concert Series

Sounds & Sights on Thursday Nights, one of Michigan’s premier summer concert series, is accepting applications to be considered for this summer’s entertainment lineup. Auditions will be held from 5 to 8 p.m., March 4, in downtown Chelsea. This year’s schedule begins June 6 and continues every Thursday through August 15. Each week, 11 different…

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KUDOS

The trustees of Legacy Land Conservancy, Michigan’s oldest local land trust, have appointed Diana Kern to lead the organization as executive director. Kern brings more than a dozen years of experience in nonprofit executive leadership, fund development, relationship management, budget management, board support and staff development to her new role at Legacy. She recently served…

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K.West High-Tech Luxury Spa

K.West Skin Body Soul is a high-vi­brational luxury spa in Ann Arbor offering advanced skin and body ther­apies rooted in ayurvedic and Chinese traditions. They feature non-invasive, non-thermal DNA skin rejuvenation for complete support and renewal of all skin conditions including acne and aging. Offerings include: 12-session nutrition­al and life coaching programs integrated with skin…

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Health Briefs

10 Common Symptoms of Mold Biotoxin Illness

Mold biotoxin illness (CIRS, or chronic inflammatory response syndrome) is caused by prolonged exposure to mold and mold spore biotoxins. Some people have genes that prevent their bodies from being able to recognize and eliminate these biotoxins. This then triggers a systemic inflammatory response that results in CIRS. The 10 most-common symptoms include chronic fatigue,…

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BIG BREAKFAST, LOWER BODY MASS

A study of more than 50,000 people in the Czech  Republic by the Seventh-Day Adventist Loma Linda  university, in California, found that those that made breakfast their largest meal of the day had lower body mass index (BmI) levels. Lunch as the largest daily meal showed the next best results. The researchers concluded that timing…

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Zinc Inhibits Throat Cancer

Research from the university of Texas at Arlington reported in The FASEB Journal, published by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, has found that zinc supplements can inhibit or slow the growth of esophageal cancer cells. The research also found that zinc deficiency is common among throat cancer patients. Zinc-rich foods include spinach,…

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Mercury/Autism Brain Research Alert

As the debate rages between health officials and vaccine critics about possible links to autism, mercury seems to be a specific bone of contention. It has long been present in the form of thimerisol, a preservative that inhibits bacterial contamination. Under government pressure, amounts have been reduced by the pharmaceutical industry to trace levels or…

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Lutein in Greens and Eggs Slows Cognitive Aging

Healthy diet options of spinach and kale may also help keep our brains fit. In a study from the university of Illinois appearing in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 60 adults between 25 and 45 years old having higher levels of lutein, a nutrient found in green, leafy vegetables, avocados and eggs, had neural responses more…

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FISH OIL TWICE WEEKLY EASES ARTHRITIS

Eating fish at least twice a week may significantly reduce the pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis,in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the joints, creating swelling and pain. Studies have already shown the beneficial effect of fish oil supplements on rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, but a new study of 176 participants at Brigham…

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RED WINE LESS TOXIC THAN WHITE

Alcohol has been linked with cancer in about 3.6 percent of cases worldwide, due to the presence of acetaldehyde, which damages DNA and prevents it from repairing itself. A study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention that involved 200,000 people found a distinct connection between white wine in particular and melanoma, the deadliest type…

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Hemp Oil Cuts Seizure Frequency in Half

Research from the New York University Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center has found that cannabidiol, a non psychoactive extract of hemp oil, significantly reduces seizure rates in epileptics. Scientists there tested 120 children and young adults with epilepsy and found that the cannabidiol group’s number of seizures per month decreased from 12.4 to 5.9 compared to…

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AEROBICS KEEP THE BRAIN YOUNG

Simple movement turns out to be the best way to lift mood, improve memory and protect the brain against age-related cognitive decline, according to Harvard Medical School researchers in an article, “Aerobic Exercise is the Key for Your Head, Just as It is for Your Heart.” Even brisk walking or jogging for 45 minutes can…

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Sugar Linked to Depression

The journal Scientific Reports recently published a study that confirmed a link between a diet high in sugar and common mental disorders. In 2002, researchers from Baylor College found that higher rates of refined sugar consumption were associated with higher rates of depression. A 2015 study that included nearly 70,000 women found a higher likelihood…

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Global Briefs

Mind Meld

Translating Thoughts Into Speech Scientists are trying to translate speech-paralyzed patients’ thoughts into speech using brain implants. The technique will potentially provide a brain/computer interface (BCI) to enable people with a spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke or other paralyzing conditions to “talk” again. Experts think a system that decodes whether a person is…

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Horse Sense

Wild Horses Ride Out the Storm North Carolina’s freeroaming wild horse herds on the Outer Banks have “ridden out” their share of storms. When Hurricane Florence struck the area in 2018, the Corolla Wild Horse Fund of Currituck County, where the herd lives, announced on Facebook, “The horses have lived on this barrier island for…

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Bat Cave Rescue

Promising Progress Against Disease A cold-loving fungus known as white-nose syndrome (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) originating in Eurasia, where bats evolved to develop immunity to it, began infecting 15 species of hibernating bats in North America in 2006. As the fungus grows over bats’ noses and wings, it disrupts their winter sleep, causing them to expend too…

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Fish Revival

Shad Return After 174-Year Absence Following the removal two years ago of an obsolete dam in Manville, New Jersey, American shad are successfully spawning in the lower section of the Millstone River. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recently observed juvenile fish there for the first time since 1845. American shad (Alosa sapidissima)…

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Bug Apocalypse

Sharp Decline Threatens Ecosystem Insects around the world are in a crisis, and a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that the problem is even more widespread than scientists first believed. In a pristine rain forest in Puerto Rico, the number of invertebrates—including moths, butterflies, spiders and grasshoppers—dropped…

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Ancient Canines

Presumed Extinct Dog Species Rediscovered After thinking the New Guinea highland wild dog had gone extinct in its native habitat, researchers have now confirmed the existence of a healthy, viable population, hidden on the island in one of the most remote and inhospitable regions on Earth. According to DNA analysis, these are the most ancient…

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Rare Breed

Exmoor Ponies Beat the Odds The Exmoor pony, which inhabits an area bordered by Devon and Somerset counties in England, is currently listed as endangered by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. It’s believed that these ponies derive from the original prehistoric horse that made the trek from Alaska to Great Britain some 130,000 years ago.…

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Fire Hounds

Dogs Help Restore Burnt Forests in Chile Forest fires in Chile ravaged vast swathes of land in 2017, burning sturdy older trees in the El Maule region. Since then, three border collies belonging to Francisca Torres, a member of the environmental nonprofit Pewos, have been wandering through the charred remains with special satchels that spray…

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Happy Hoppers

Nature Finds a Way Frogs and toads are returning in parts of Panama after a deadly fungal disease devastated amphibians in Central America from 2004 to 2007. New research shows that evolution may have saved the day. In El Cope, at least four species disappeared, including the redstriped Rio San Juan robber frog. Four other…

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Smart Trash

Baltimore Rolls Out Sensor-Equipped Bins Baltimore is spending $15 million to deploy 4,000 sensor equipped trash receptacles that signal when they need emptying to increase collection efficiency. “The cans come with Wi-Fi; we will utilize this capability to allow the can to transmit information, including how full it is, so we can offer as-needed servicing of the cans,”…

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Eco Tips

Tips for a Tree-Free Home

Many Ways to Pare Down Paper Use If one in five households switched to electronic bills, statements and payments, the collective impact would save 151 million pounds of paper annually, eliminating 8.6 million full garbage bags and 2 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to the PayItGreen Alliance. While computers continue to offer significant…

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Breathe Easy

Ways to Improve Indoor Air Quality For much of the country, winter means spending more time indoors—and exposed to potential toxins. Indoor air quality is critically important to children, the elderly and people with respiratory problems that may be especially sensitive to pollutants, according to WebMD.com. Recognizing and avoiding some of the most common sources…

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Earth Christmas

Guide to Sustainable Merry-Making There is symmetry between living in an ecoconscious manner and the spirit of Christmas. Striving for peace on Earth and good will to all can also be expressed in reducing the holiday’s impact on the planet. Alternatives to a cut or artificial plastic Christmas tree abound. Purchase a potted tree to…

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Rebirthing Books

New Life for Old Friends Spread the wonders and joys of reading to others while conserving woodlands and other resources and keeping books out of landfills by donating them. Many outlets welcome books that may have been collecting dust at home, but can enrich the lives of others of all ages, both locally and worldwide.…

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Last Straw

Groups Work to Make U.S. Go Strawless About 500 million plastic straws are discarded daily in America, reports the U.S. National Park Service. Plastic that reaches waterways is ingested by marine life and our food chain. Individuals and municipalities are taking action to support options, including going strawless. The Last Plastic Straw (TheLastPlasticStraw.org), a project…

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Action Alert

Sway Congress

Save Wild Horses Campaign Update The Trump Administration’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget again calls on Congress to lift long-standing prohibitions on the destruction and slaughter of wild horses and burros. The budget seeks to cut approximately $14 million of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management Wild Horse and Burro Program by selling as many as 90,000 federally protected…

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