Letter From The Publishers

Celebrating 25 Years

We’re pleased to announce that this month, Natural Awakenings is celebrating 25 years of publishing. Gracing our cover, Sharon Bruckman, our illustrious leader and CEO, reminds us that the real “natural awakening” is about each of us waking up to who we truly are and the kind of world we can create together. Be sure…

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Local Articles & Spotlights

Feeding the Organs for Winter Maintenance

By David Stouffer

Western medicine excels at treatment options for a variety of ailments, but often falls short of providing optimal prevention strategies. It’s true that recent changes in traditional Western healthcare phi­losophy…

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A Marriage of Creativity & Spirituality

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

Mara Evenstar is the co-owner of Evenstar’s Chalice, director of Conscious Rites, board member of the Intentional Living Collective and co-founder of Sophia Unfolds: These organizations were all created to…

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New Workshops at Castle Remedies

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

Castle Remedies and manager Mary Tillinghast have launched a new winter season of homeopathic classes. She says, “In these workshops, we will briefly touch on the history and theory behind…

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Huron River Watershed Council Needs Local Representation

By Martin Miron

by Martin Miron Sixty-seven local governments in the Huron River Watershed Council (HRWC) have the power to determine the location of houses, farms and businesses throughout the watershed. These land…

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Local Sustainable Food from Fresh Forage

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

The owners of Fresh Forage, chef Sam Boyce and Andrew Sereno, both grew up in Chelsea and went to high school together, graduating in 2006. After parting ways for college—Boyce…

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A Focus on Healing the Entire Body at Thrive

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

At Thrive Wellness Center, in Saline, owner Shannon Roznay, DC, is a chiropractor who also specializes in advanced trained Nutrition Response Testing (NRT). She states, “I decided I wanted to…

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News Briefs

Secret Ingredients

New Film Shares Stories of Hope and Healing A new feature-length documentary, Secret Ingredients, makes a compelling case for why organic foods may be the key to unlocking better health and reversing chronic illnesses ranging from asthma to autism. The film shares the uplifting stories of individuals and families that overcame their struggles with digestive…

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Ann Arbor Christmas Bird Count

The next Ann Arbor Christmas Bird Count (CBC), sponsored by the Washtenaw Audubon Society, will be conducted on December 15, and it is open to birders of all skill levels as part of a continent-wide effort coordinated by the National Audubon Society. About 1,700 counts are conducted across North America each year within a window…

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Buhr Park Hosts Fun Winter Activities

The Buhr Outdoor Ice Arena is open for public skating and the Day Camp Outdoor Pool Swim Lessons Swim Team Splash Days winter registration in the Ann Arbor parks is underway. The rink has a cooled subfloor to maintain ice even when it is over 50 degrees outside. Activities include public ice skating, drop-in hockey…

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Holistic Healing Workshop at Align Chiropractic

Holistic therapist Barbra White will facilitate Self-Acceptance Process (SAP) workshops from 7:30 to 9 p.m., on the second Wednesday of the month beginning December 11, at Align Chiropractic. She says, “Erase shame, create change in your life and be a healer to others. Self-Acceptance Process healers training and sessions magnify the good, speed up change…

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Baby, It’s Cold Outside

The Michigan Theater and Art Deco State Theatre, in Ann Arbor, comprise a rare community asset. Executive Director Russell Collins says, “Not many cities, large or small, have managed to save their historic theaters. Even fewer have been able to maintain their theaters as lovingly as the Michigan and State Theaters have been.” The State…

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Classical Bells Holiday Concert

The Ann Arbor District Library will host the annual Classical Bells Holiday Concert at 3:30 p.m., December 9. A group of seasoned professionals, led by Musical Director Darlene Ebersole, has performed in concerts nationwide and appeared as featured performers with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the Michigan Opera Theater. Founded in 1983, Classical Bells has…

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The Nutcracker Tradition Continues

Ballet Chelsea and the Jackson Symphony Orchestra will present Ballet Chelsea’s 21st annual performance of The Nutcracker on December 1 and 2 in Chelsea and December 8 and 9 in Jackson. This full-length, narrated ballet is choreographed by Ballet Chelsea Artistic Director Wendi DuBois and will feature a live symphony orchestra. From Christmas Eve festivities at…

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Christmas Events in Dexter

The Dexter Area Historical Society presents several events for the holiday season. At Holiday Bazaar at the Museum, December 1, the annual Holiday Bazaar at the Dexter Area Museum features tables full of handcrafted items, holiday ornaments and décor, winter apparel for everyone, decorative centerpieces and more. Santa will be at the museum for photos…

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Kudos

The Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies (AMWA) awarded the city of Ann Arbor a 2018 Gold Award for Exceptional Water Utility Performance, its highest honor, October 15 in San Francisco. Ann Arbor was recognized for its exceptional service to customers, strategic decision-making and investment in its staff. Ann Arbor Water Treatment Plant Manager Brian Steglitz…

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Tell Me a Story at Storyfest

The Ann Arbor Storytellers’ Guild presents Storyfest at 7 p.m., November 9, at Trinity Lutheran Church. For 27 consecutive years, the Ann Arbor Storytellers’ Guild has charmed audiences with its annual storytelling concert called Storyfest. Watch for “Moth” winners among this year’s eight featured tellers. Storyfest is 90 minutes of non-stop adventure, mystery, romance and…

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Health Briefs

Daily Walks Make Kids Healthier

Thanks to a program called The Daily Mile, Scottish schoolchildren have shown improvements in their fitness and body composition, researchers from the universities of Edinburgh and Sterling report. Started by a teacher in 2012, the initiative encourages children to run, jog or walk around their school grounds during a 15-minute recess from classes in addition…

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Nettle Leaf Helps Inflammatory Bowel Patients

Nettle, a common roadside weed, may offer hope for sufferers of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. Research from Iran’s University of Medical Sciences tested 59 patients with inflammatory bowel disease in a 12-week, double-blind clinical trial with an extract of nettle leaf (Urtica dioica). Those receiving the nettle leaf extract had…

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Beet Juice Boosts Stamina

Beetroot juice supplements increase exercise duration and intensity for heart failure patients with a condition called reduced ejection fraction, which affects about half of such patients. In previous studies, beets have been shown to increase exercise capacity for healthy people because they increase nitric oxide levels in the blood.

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Eating Mediterranean Diet Helps Save Eyesight

The risk of late-stage, age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, can be lowered by 41 percent by eating a Mediterranean diet, according to a new study presented by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). The research, which followed nearly 4,500 French and Dutch adults aged 55 and older for 21 years, found…

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Artificial Sweeteners Harm Gut Microbes

Six popular artificial sweeteners approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—aspartame, sucralose, neotame, saccharine, advantame and acesulfame potassium-k-were found to be toxic to digestive gut microbes in a new paper published in Molecules. Researchers at Israel’s Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University tested each sweetener along with 10 sports drinks…

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Stress Lowers Women’s Fertility

Women that feel highly stressed on a daily basis have a lower ability to conceive, report Boston University School of Medicine researchers. In a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, 4,769 couples that were trying to conceive were followed for a year. Those women with the highest self-reported stress were 13 percent less…

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Optimism Linked to Better Heart Health

Being upbeat helps heart health, reports a new review of research from Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Analyzing dozens of studies on psychological wellbeing involving hundreds of thousands of people, the researchers found that the most optimistic people are more likely to kick a smoking habit, exercise regularly and favor fruits and vegetables…

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Low-Nutrition Foods Linked to Cancers

In a 10-nation stud involving nearly half a million Europeans, researchers found that those eating foods with lower nutritional quality had a significantly greater incidence of cancer, especially colorectal, upper digestive tract, stomach and lung cancers for men, and liver and postmenopausal breast cancers for women. The study supports wider adoption of a British front-of…

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Foot Reflexology Can Help Diabetics

Diabetes interferes with the function of the pancreas in blood sugar regulation. Poorly controlled blood sugar levels can affect blood vessels and nerve endings in the kidneys, eyes, heart, feet, brain and skin. Diabetics may develop high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney disease, vision problems and poor circulation to hands and feet, among other problems.…

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Dark Chocolate Proven Healthier than Ever

Dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cacao can have positive effects on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory and immunity, according to two new studies from Loma Linda University, in California. Ten participants ate a 48-gram bar of dark chocolate at the beginning of each study and then ate a piece of dark chocolate every two…

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Global Briefs

Ancient Canines

Presumed Extinct Dog Species Rediscovered After thinking the New Guinea highland wild dog had gone extinct in its native habitat, researchers have now confirmed the existence of a healthy, viable population, hidden on the island in one of the most remote and inhospitable regions on Earth. According to DNA analysis, these are the most ancient…

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Rare Breed

Exmoor Ponies Beat the Odds The Exmoor pony, which inhabits an area bordered by Devon and Somerset counties in England, is currently listed as endangered by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. It’s believed that these ponies derive from the original prehistoric horse that made the trek from Alaska to Great Britain some 130,000 years ago.…

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Fire Hounds

Dogs Help Restore Burnt Forests in Chile Forest fires in Chile ravaged vast swathes of land in 2017, burning sturdy older trees in the El Maule region. Since then, three border collies belonging to Francisca Torres, a member of the environmental nonprofit Pewos, have been wandering through the charred remains with special satchels that spray…

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Happy Hoppers

Nature Finds a Way Frogs and toads are returning in parts of Panama after a deadly fungal disease devastated amphibians in Central America from 2004 to 2007. New research shows that evolution may have saved the day. In El Cope, at least four species disappeared, including the redstriped Rio San Juan robber frog. Four other…

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Smart Trash

Baltimore Rolls Out Sensor-Equipped Bins Baltimore is spending $15 million to deploy 4,000 sensor equipped trash receptacles that signal when they need emptying to increase collection efficiency. “The cans come with Wi-Fi; we will utilize this capability to allow the can to transmit information, including how full it is, so we can offer as-needed servicing of the cans,”…

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3-D Domiciles

High-Tech Instant Homes on Horizon A 3-D printed home can be built in less than 24 hours at a cost of $10,000. Developers hope to cut it to $4,000 to help families living in poverty or other unsafe conditions. New Story, a housing charity organization, and ICON, a construction tech company, have partnered to try…

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Cork Rocks

The Self-Regenerating Building Material Cork is both recyclable and renewable because it regenerates its bark after harvesting, which causes no harm to trees. Durable cork can be found in the flooring of the Library of Congress and as an insulator for space shuttles. It’s also a waterproof, abrasion-resistant fire retardant and acoustic insulator with odor…

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Poor Packaging

The Problem With Bottled Water Is the Bottle One million plastic bottles are sold around the world each minute. Most are used for bottled water, and most end up in the trash. As demand grows, especially in China, so does the bottle problem. According to environmental watchdog Euromonitor, if the present rate of consumption is…

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Monstrous Morass

Great Pacific Garbage Patch Out of Control In the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and California, the 80,000-ton Great Pacific Garbage Patch is growing. Encompassing 600,000 square miles, the world’s largest such dump is twice the size of Texas, according to a three-year mapping effort by eight organizations. “To solve a problem, we need to understand…

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Meatless Munchies

Vegan Beer Hall Highlights Plant-Based Food People relying on plant-based diets can find it challenging to honor their philosophies when enjoying a night out in a beer hall. But in Quincy, Massachusetts, the tavern Rewild is giving hope to those that want to get a little buzzed and still trust the menu. Owner Pat McAuley…

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Eco Tips

Breathe Easy

Ways to Improve Indoor Air Quality For much of the country, winter means spending more time indoors—and exposed to potential toxins. Indoor air quality is critically important to children, the elderly and people with respiratory problems that may be especially sensitive to pollutants, according to WebMD.com. Recognizing and avoiding some of the most common sources…

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Earth Christmas

Guide to Sustainable Merry-Making There is symmetry between living in an ecoconscious manner and the spirit of Christmas. Striving for peace on Earth and good will to all can also be expressed in reducing the holiday’s impact on the planet. Alternatives to a cut or artificial plastic Christmas tree abound. Purchase a potted tree to…

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Rebirthing Books

New Life for Old Friends Spread the wonders and joys of reading to others while conserving woodlands and other resources and keeping books out of landfills by donating them. Many outlets welcome books that may have been collecting dust at home, but can enrich the lives of others of all ages, both locally and worldwide.…

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Last Straw

Groups Work to Make U.S. Go Strawless About 500 million plastic straws are discarded daily in America, reports the U.S. National Park Service. Plastic that reaches waterways is ingested by marine life and our food chain. Individuals and municipalities are taking action to support options, including going strawless. The Last Plastic Straw (TheLastPlasticStraw.org), a project…

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Green Shoes

Being Sustainable Down to Our Soles Following an environmentally friendly lifestyle can be felt right down to our toes. Increase the life of footwear by being properly fitted in high-quality shoes, performing ongoing maintenance and patronizing cobblers. Pay extra attention to waterproofing shoes in winter and rainy seasons. Also, vegan alternatives to leather are available.…

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Action Alert

Sway Congress

Save Wild Horses Campaign Update The Trump Administration’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget again calls on Congress to lift long-standing prohibitions on the destruction and slaughter of wild horses and burros. The budget seeks to cut approximately $14 million of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management Wild Horse and Burro Program by selling as many as 90,000 federally protected…

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