Letter From The Publishers

Brighten the World’s Future

The health of humanity is directly tied to the health of the planet we call home. This edition celebrates change-makers—people that set out to make a recognizable difference in their communities and beyond. Natural Awakenings magazine, always big on solutions, shines a light on the lives of individuals heeding the call to create needed change.…

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Local Articles & Spotlights

A Focus on Healing the Entire Body at Thrive

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

At Thrive Wellness Center, in Saline, owner Shannon Roznay, DC, is a chiropractor who also specializes in advanced trained Nutrition Response Testing (NRT). She states, “I decided I wanted to…

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Helping People Connect with Themselves & Others

By Martin Miron

Seth Kopald became an Internal Family Systems (IFS) practitioner in 2012. He leads individual sessions, couple communication coaching, and groups. He creates a safe space and guides people to care…

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Parents Are Human, Too

By Seth Kopald

Most parents have a natural drive to want their children to succeed in life. Without studying child development and other fields like psychology, it is difficult to know which parenting…

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Maintaining Good Pediatric Oral Health

By Dr. Abbie Walker

by Dr. Abbie Walker Oral health is just one of many factors in maintaining the overall health of the body. When it comes to caring for a child’s oral health,…

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Breast Cancer Diagnostic Options

By Malcolm Sickels MD

by Malcolm Sickels MD Thermography as a way of diagnosing disease has been around for thousands of years. Back in the old days, they would smear mud on people and…

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Horse Sense Helps Humans

By Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp.

Connecting Humans with Equine Wisdom (CHEW) hosts Equine Facilitated Coaching (EFC) retreats for specific groups, businesses and individual coaching in the beautiful setting of Synchrony Farm, near Saline, Michigan. Working…

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News Briefs

KUDOS

A  team of about 25 Toyota Motor North America Research and Development employees worked with Habitat For Humanity from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., September 15, on homes located at 2828 and 2827 Woodruff Lane, in Ypsilanti. About wrapping up the 13-week volunteer-driven renovation project, Sarah Stanton, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Huron Valley,…

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Dental House Offers New Dental Practice

Ramy Attalla, DMD, has opened a new practice, Dental House, at 4860 Washtenaw Avenue, Suite D, in Ann Arbor, also serving Ypsilanti. The facilities are brand-new and are equipped with the most recent technology, and each of the participating dental professionals has more than 10 years of hands-on experience. The practice includes family dentistry, cosmetic…

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National Solar Tour Has Local Impact

The 2018 National (self-guided) Solar Tour of Homes on October 6 and 7, a partnership between Solar United Neighbors and the American Solar Energy Society, will be the largest ever, with more than 400 participants. Dave Strenski, with Solar Ypsi, will speak about practical solar applications from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., October 7, at…

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Award-Winning Children’s Series Releases Third Book

The Adventures of Energy Annie, the award-winning series for children written by Elizabeth Cosmos and illustrated by K. Henriott-Jauw, will release the third book, The Importance of Integrity, in October. This series introduces children to the subtle world of energy, as well as learning the importance of virtues through life lessons. As in the first…

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Only the Best for All Pets

Huron Pet Supply is a locally owned and operated business serving Washtenaw county since 1986. Kyle Williams, who is proud to be the third generation of family involved in the daily store operations says, “We offer premier customer service and a wide selection of quality foods and supplies, including a full range of natural and…

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Nutritional Healing Center Gets a Facelift in New Digs

Nutrition expert Darren Schmidt, DC, and his staff of more than 20 have relocated to the former Sun & Snow location at 462 Jackson Plaza, in Ann Arbor, to better service their patients. There will be an open house from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., October 12, where tours of the facility and introductions to Schmidt…

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Kennedy Celebrates First year of Reiki Business

Andrea Kennedy, a reiki master practitioner and instructor and owner of Mainstream Reiki, in Saline, is celebrating her first anniversary in business at 7 p.m., October 19, at the Evangelical Homes of Michigan (EHM). Kennedy has been practicing reiki since 1995 and lived in Saline since 2015. She holds free monthly reiki share events and…

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Fall Classes with Castoldi at Crazy Wisdom

Dr. Kapila Castoldi, of the Sri Chinmoy Centre, will be offering an Introduction to the Principles of Ayurveda from 3 to 6 p.m., September 23 and 30 at the Crazy Wisdom Bookstore. Topics include Ayurveda as a Philosophy of Life; Basics of Ayurveda; Discovering Your Ayurveda Constitution; Secrets of Balanced Living; and Awareness and Conscious…

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Join People’s Climate March in Ann Arbor

As part of a global day of action, the Ann Arbor People’s Climate March will be held at noon on September 8 in the library lot located at 350 south fifth avenue, in Ann Arbor. Led locally by Alan Haber of Rise for Climate, it will be one of thousands of rallies taking place worldwide…

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Bringing Bread to Life in Milan

Stephanie Ariganello and Jeremiah Kouhia, co-owners of the Mother Loaf Breads bakery, in Milan, will explore the long and crunchy history of sourdough from 3 to 5 p.m., September 16, at the Malletts Creek Branch Library. They will explain the basics of how they make their long, cold, slow-fermentation loaves and dive into the most…

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Health Briefs

Top 10 Uses for Applied Kinesiology

A patient’s nutritional status can impact their body’s ability to heal and “hold” its chiropractic adjustments. Applied Kinesiology offers results that far surpass that of basic Chiropractic. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome may be caused by one or more muscles that hold the bones of the wrist and forearm together, and is easily corrected. Shoulder Injuries may…

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Foot Reflexology: It’s All Good

Foot reflexology proceeds from the idea that each person is a complete and unique whole being. At times, the person’s system gets out of balance, causing discomfort, distress or illness. Foot reflexology facilitates bringing the system back into balance, thus restoring health. Outside influences such as microbes, stress or poisons can disrupt the body’s equilibrium.…

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Natural Vitamin E Lowers Heart Risks

Tocotrienols are a natural form of vitamin E found in a number of foods, including wheat, barley, corn, rice and palm fruit. A recent meta-review of clinical research finds that tocotrienols can decrease heart related health risks in seniors such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

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Vitamin D Supplements Ease Irritable Bowels

Oncology researchers from the University of Sheffield, in the UK, report that people with irritable bowel syndrome tend to be low in vitamin D. In a review of research, they found that supplemental vitamin D tends to ease associated symptoms such as bloating, stomach cramps and constipation, and improve quality of life. R_Szatkowski/Shutterstock.com

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Music Lessons Make Kids Smarter

Structured music lessons significantly enhance children’s cognitive abilities, including language-based reasoning, short-term memory and planning, while reducing inhibition, leading to improved academic performance, report researchers from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. In the study, 147 Dutch 6-year-olds were divided into music, visual arts and control groups, and monitored for two-and-a-half years. The children in the music group…

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Knitting Releases the Blues 

Knitting can alleviate the blues, slow the onset of dementia and distract from chronic pain, according to a survey published in The British Journal of Occupational Therapy. Eighty-one percent of respondents described feeling happier after a session of needlework. In another study, researchers at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind-Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital found…

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Acupuncture Soothes Dental Anxiety

Dental anxiety, which can produce dizziness, nausea and breathing difficulties in 4 to 30 percent of patients worldwide, may be relieved by acupuncture, according to research from the University of York, in the UK. Analyzing six studies of 800 patients, researchers found that acupuncture reduced anxiety by an average of eight points on an 80-point…

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Calorie Restriction Slows Aging

Thirty-seven healthy, non-obese adults between 21 and 50 years old put on a calorie restriction diet for two years showed reduced systemic oxidative stress, indicating greater protection against age-related neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as cancer and diabetes. Participants in this research, conducted by Pennington Biomedical Research, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana,…

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Music Reduces Need for Post-Surgery Opioids

Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, have found that receiving music therapy can significantly lessen a patient’s need for opioids and other painkillers after invasive surgery. The researchers tested 161 patients; 49 in the music group and 112 in a control group. After their surgery, both groups were offered painkillers intravenously at doses…

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Meditation Improves Long-Term Cognition

Cognitive gains that people experience from an intense meditation retreat can persist for at least seven years and slow age-related cognitive decline, a new study shows. Researchers from the University of California at Davis followed up with 60 people that had participated in a three-month retreat in which they meditated in a group and alone…

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Global Briefs

Air Fare

By 2050, the world’s population is estimated to hit 10 billion, and food production will need to increase by 70 percent. Traditional farming won’t be able to keep up. Lisa Dyson, who holds three degrees in physics, including a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Boston, knows the reason: ubiquitous carbon dioxide. This byproduct of burning fossil fuels…

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Turtle Turnaround

Hatchlings Return to Mumbai Beach After 20 Years At Versova Beach, in the Indian coastal city of Mumbai, local volunteers have stepped up to finally clean up a shore covered in ankledeep trash and waste. The United Nations described the transformation as the world’s largest beach cleanup project ever, and the work has been rewarded with…

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Corporate Conscience

Leading Food Companies Aim to Slash Energy Footprints McDonald’s plans to reduce greenhouse emissions from their restaurants, corporate offices and supply chain by more than 30 percent by 2030. They’re the first restaurant chain with goals backed by the Science Based Targets initiative. The company expects to decrease its total emissions by more than 150…

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Debris Drop-Off

Plastic Bag Deterrents Working in European Waters A new study shows that there are significantly fewer plastic bags on the seafloor since a number of European countries introduced fees on them, according to a 25-year study from the UK government’s Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS). Researchers saw an estimated 30 percent drop…

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Ivory Outlawed

UK Banning Both Legal and Illegal Trade The UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is in the process of implementing a near-total ivory ban. It can’t happen soon enough because elephant populations continue to dramatically decline. As recognized by the parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species last September, “Countries…

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Food Finder

Software Tracks Farm to Fork Supply Chain Serious concerns have surfaced about food transparency, and people are asking questions. Documentaries like Rotten urge consumers to think twice about the origins and ingredients of their food, but answers are not always readily available. In addition to environmental concerns like long-distance transportation, people are worried about food…

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Pipeline Slowdown

Animal Safety Measures Delay Tree Cutting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has denied a request by Dominion Energy, the lead builder of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, for more time to cut trees along the route. The company had to stop cutting by the end of March in order to protect migratory birds and endangered…

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Flower Power

Farms Test Low-Tech Pesticide Alternative To make sure more beneficial bugs come to their crops to feed on pests, farmers are planting flowers in the middle of their fields. On a farm near the town of Buckingham, England, a crop of oilseed rape is planted amidst rows of wildflowers. It’s one of 14 sites in…

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Action Alert

Migratory Birds Threatened by Rule Change A coalition of national environmental groups led by the National Audubon Society filed a lawsuit in may against the u.S. Department of the Interior challenging the federal administration’s move last December to eliminate longstanding protections for waterfowl, raptors and songbirds under the 100-year-old migratory Bird Treaty Act (mBTA). The…

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Hopeful Sign

Animals Gain Some Protection in New Budget The Humane Society Legislative Fund, the government affairs affiliate of the Humane Society of the u.S., worked with animal protection champions in both chambers and with other stakeholders to secure success on several fronts in the 2018 federal budget. Victories include preventing the slaughter of wild horses and…

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Eco Tips

Last Straw

Groups Work to Make U.S. Go Strawless About 500 million plastic straws are discarded daily in America, reports the U.S. National Park Service. Plastic that reaches waterways is ingested by marine life and our food chain. Individuals and municipalities are taking action to support options, including going strawless. The Last Plastic Straw (TheLastPlasticStraw.org), a project…

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Green Shoes

Being Sustainable Down to Our Soles Following an environmentally friendly lifestyle can be felt right down to our toes. Increase the life of footwear by being properly fitted in high-quality shoes, performing ongoing maintenance and patronizing cobblers. Pay extra attention to waterproofing shoes in winter and rainy seasons. Also, vegan alternatives to leather are available.…

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Rethinking Toiletries

Using Less Saves Both Money and the Planet The maxim “less is more” applies well to skin care and personal hygiene. Overuse of products is costly and increases pollution. Both genders are prone to overdoing it when it comes to basic activities like washing, shampooing and shaving. Here are some helpful tips. Take fewer showers…

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Natural Pools

Swim Amidst Stones and Plants Those spending time in their traditional home swimming pool this summer or taking the plunge to install a natural pool have healthy and cost-saving options. Saltwater pools are far better for skin, hair and lungs. Their use of sodium chloride reduces possible side effects from long-term exposure to the chlorine…

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Rail Trails

Summer Vacations with a Fun Twist This summer, consider the convenience and relaxation of watching the world go by outside a panoramic side window instead of focusing on driving the road ahead. Train travel is also more cost-effective, affordable and eco-friendly than flying. SmarterTravel.com highlights railroad discounts for children, seniors, students, AAA members, military personnel…

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Action Alert

Sway Congress

Save Wild Horses Campaign Update The Trump Administration’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget again calls on Congress to lift long-standing prohibitions on the destruction and slaughter of wild horses and burros. The budget seeks to cut approximately $14 million of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management Wild Horse and Burro Program by selling as many as 90,000 federally protected…

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